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  • Karen Suarez

10 RED FLAGS TO CONSIDER WHEN OFFERED THE JOB

Did you have any trepidation while going through the #interview process? It's great to get the job offer, especially if you have been searching for a long time and it seems to be a good company and match for you. However, if you have an unsettled feeling about accepting, think about any of the following red flags.

THE ROLE IS NOT CLEARLY DEFINED

If you are uncertain about the daily responsibilities and expectations, be wary. You need to know what is expected of you to perform the job well. Also, perhaps they have not given careful thought to their needs. In that case, you may not get to do what you want, hindering advancement opportunities or preventing you from leveraging your skills.

DID THE INTERVIEWER BAD MOUTH FORMER OR CURRENT EMPLOYEES?

Anytime a hiring manager says something negative about employees, think again about taking the offer. That is unprofessional and says a lot about the personality of the person with whom you will be working.


WERE YOU GIVEN AN UNREASONABLY SHORT TIME TO COMMIT?

If you have been given a day or two to consider the offer, always ask for additional time if you need it. Ideally, employers should be respectful and offer you time to consider committing. It is the norm to provide at least a week, ideally two weeks, to allow you to respond.


DID YOU TALK WITH SEVERAL INTERVIEWERS WHO SAID CONFLICTING THINGS ABOUT THE JOB?

Ideally, everyone should be on the same page when interviewing candidates. If you are confused after the interview process and are still unclear about their goals and expectations, consider this a huge red flag.


WERE YOU UNABLE TO MEET THE TEAM?

It would be best if you met at least some of your future colleagues. After all, you will be working with them (whether daily or occasionally), and you need to know if there will be a good fit.


IS THERE A HIGH TURNOVER RATE?

Ideally, you would know why the position is available. If there has been a revolving door for people leaving, there is probably a reason and not a good one.


WERE YOU ASKED PERSONAL OR ILLEGAL QUESTIONS?

Professional HR staff and hiring managers should know what constitutes illegal interview questions. If you were asked probing, personal questions about your life outside of work, marital status, age, nationality, race, sexual orientation, etc., be careful in deciding to work there. Chances are, this speaks to the values of someone who may be your boss. Regardless of how much you want the job, think about whether you want to work for someone concerned about things that have nothing to do with how you will perform on the job.

THE INTERVIEWER TALKED ABOUT THEMSELVES TOO MUCH

Were you given a chance to talk about how you can add value to the organization? Did the interviewer talk about themselves without asking you what you look forward to doing on the job, why you want to work there, or if you had questions? You can only make a decision based on what you know about the employer and job.


UNORGANIZED INTERVIEWING PROCESS

Schedules change, and things happen. If, however, it is excessive, perhaps that implies an unorganized office. Did the hiring manager change interviews multiple times without providing reasons? Did the person forget the interview time or take calls during the meeting? Even if the person had legitimate concerns unrelated to the interview, they should have put on a professional face.


YOU HAVE NOT SEEN WHERE YOU WILL WORK

If you are required to work onsite rather than remotely, it's best to see where you will work. Do they have a place for you, or will they figure it out once you begin? You don't want to find yourself working in an uncomfortable space on your first day.

Make sure there is transparency during the interview process and ask questions. If you have concerns the employer cannot address adequately, you might want to continue your #jobsearch.

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